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The 19 presidential candidates who participated in the AFSCME Public Service Forum on Saturday disagreed on a range of topics, but they all agreed on o

Members like Tyler Moroles, a program analyst at the Minneapolis Housing Authority. Moroles helps families receive housing vouchers for rental assistance.

My work reaches 16,000 people and 5,500 families," he says. “These are families that could be you…If you lost your job, you're just a couple of paychecks away from being that family."

"If you feed a child," says Atlanta school cafeteria manager Rachel Cooper, "you nourish that body... that mind... that spirit."

Cooper loves the educational aspect of her job, teaching children about nutrition and health — that food doesn't have to be junk to taste good! When she makes kale, for example, she knows she may be introducing something new into a child's diet and could be creating healthy habits to last a lifetime.

For too many years, public service workers (and actually most Americans) have seen their job security, wages and benefits, and retirement security erode — even though for the top 1 percent things have been great. Now, when it’s our turn to make things better for our families, they’re trying to cripple our union. We’re not going to let that happen.

We have a plan and the power to protect the jobs, financial security and future of AFSCME members. That plan is AFSCME Strong. We know that in order to survive we need to be strong.