News

Updating wills before heading into work. Extending the lives of single-use masks. Self-isolating from their own families.

We were notified recently of a positive diagnosis for COVID-19 for two people who attended the rally at SERV in Ewing on March 11, 2020.

The coronavirus aid package that cleared Congress is just not good enough for public service workers. That’s the takeaway message from AFSCME President Lee Saunders.

As of this notice, 29 presumptive positive cases of COVID-19 (coronavirus) have been reported in New Jersey. This number is expected to rise, and state agencies and other employers of AFSCME-represented workers are taking as many precautions as possible.

Many employers have adjusted their operating hours and, in some cases, closed their facilities temporarily. All of this has resulted in an influx of calls to AFSCME New Jersey Council 63 staff with questions and concerns about how to handle this ever-evolving situation.

As the coronavirus (COVID-19) emerges in the United States, many AFSCME members are and will continue to be on the front lines caring for and transporting those afflicted with the virus. Workers in emergency services, health care, child care, educational institutions and many others may come in contact with people who’ve contracted the coronavirus, putting themselves at risk.

On the eve of Saturday’s Nevada Democratic primary caucuses, AFSCME members and retirees gathered at a Las Vegas restaurant to hear one last time from presidential candidates on the issues that matter most to working families.

Time is running out to fill out an application for the AFSCME Council 63 scholarship!

AFSCME members sat down with congressional lawmakers last week to share stories about how the Public Service Freedom to Negotiate Act would improve communities and empower workers.

Through a budget proposal announced this week, President Donald Trump continues his attacks on vital programs for working families, including Medicare, Medicaid and the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

And rather than invest in America’s future, he seeks to disinvest, proposing deep funding cuts to programs in education, environmental protection, disease prevention and more.